Advance Care Directives

Though planning for the future is exciting when talking about where you are going to travel next, where you will be at in your career, or how big your family will be by that point. You have to plan ahead, should there come a time when you are unable to make decisions. There could come a time when you experience an injury or an illness that alters the ability to be able to make your own decisions. If you complete an advance care directive, you have the ability to specify what medical treatment decisions you want to be made on your behalf. You can give instructions about future medical treatment that you consent or refuse, as well as, the values and preferences for your medical treatment decision maker to consider when it is their time to make decisions for you.

 

Instructional Directives

Instructional directives are statements of your medical treatment decisions for future procedures and care. By signing an instructional directive, you are either giving consent or refusal medical treatment. Health practitioners need your consent before they can perform any medical procedure or treatment for you. The practitioner, if you are do not have decision-making capacity, will find out whether or not you have an advance care directive and follow the relevant instructional directive you had given. You shouldn’t complete an instructional directive if you do not know the medical treatment that you want to do or not want to do in the future. The practitioner will have to follow your instructions given in the directive.

 

Values Directive

A values directive will state the values and preferences of medical treatment. People have different views on whether or not a quality of life is more important than a person just being alive. People can value a caretaker while others would prefer to take care of themselves. There aren’t any right or wrong answers, what matters is that you make the choices that will best suit you later in life. It also helps to explain them to your loved ones so they have a better understanding of why you are making your decisions.

 

When completing the advance care directives form, you will sign it in front of two witnesses, one who must be a medical practitioner. You must be evaluated as in the proper capacity and sign the form voluntarily. Your directives will end if you complete a new form, cancel the appointment of the directive, the VCAT cancels your appointment, or you pass away. If you do not have a directive, your practitioner will ask your medical treatment decision maker. The decision maker will make your decisions on your behalf.

 

**This article is for informational purposes only and is not intended to be legal advice. In relation to your individual situation, always seek advice specific to your circumstances from a lawyer.

 

Keeping Information Within Your Company

No matter what type of business you are involved in, there is information that must be protected. You wouldn’t want competitors obtaining your client list or schematics of a new product. The business could not gain a competitive edge if all of its information was released. Information can be protected by legal remedies that prevent from misappropriation and unauthorized disclosure of the company’s information. If your business secures a trade secret protection it can benefit the company in the long run. Trade secrets can be difficult to keep confidential over a long period of time and when many people in your company know about it. There are many different methods that can be taken to protect your companies trade secrets but it also depends on the situation.

 

Contractual Protections

If members that are outside of your company have access to your trade secret information, you want to include a condition about confidentiality protections in your business with them. You can customize a non-disclosure agreement that includes some of the following:

  • Acknowledgment that the information given is considered a trade secret,
  • Agree not to share the information with anyone who is unauthorized,
  • The individual could not attempt to reverse engineer the information,
  • And any other protections that may be deemed necessary.

 

Employee Policies

Employees that have access to the company’s trade secrets should be subject to policies that regard the disclosure and security of information. Employees should be clear on protecting the confidential information that is produced within the company. Having employees know what information is considered to be along the lines of confidential is also a very important implementation. Even if the employee does not have access to the information, they are still expected to abide by these rules.

 

Control Over Information

The company should implement controls over the trade secrets to decrease the risk of the information getting released to employees and others who do not have a need-to-know requirement. Keycards and keycode access can help restrict certain areas of the building that are marked as secure locations for documents or materials that are specified as trade secrets. Since technology is always improving, your company most likely has electronic files of your trade secrets. To ensure safety, make sure your company’s data is secured and that only certain individuals have access to the information or codes.

 

**This article is for informational purposes only and is not intended to be legal advice. In relation to your individual situation, always seek advice specific to your circumstances from a lawyer.